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between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental disconnect between how we view p
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. if th
science. to know what rocks and soils are nearby and what they can reach or how long it might take somewhere, the use a combination of 3-d images, computer graphics, and simulations often overlaying them. these visualizations allow them to point to places, give them names, and control precisely where new photographs are taken and where the instruments are placed. so for example, they can draw a yellow box to specify where a camera should zoom in for a more detailed image. each photograph can be used like a map of an area on mars, because its location relative to the rover is precisely registered in the planning program. as we move him from panoramas used for navigating it manages about crops to the micro photographs, we can see and market up details. even small rocks and patches of soil might be named and become targets for analysis or a micro photographs. combining these planning tools in their imagination, the scientists can work as if they were on mars. jim rice, a geologist on a mission, said i put myself out there, with two boots on the ground trying to figure out where to go
, have a great week. >>> how will congress, industry and universities respond to the science funding squeeze? i'm steve usdin. welcome to "biocentury this week." >>> your trusted source for biotechnology information and analysis. "biocentury this week." >>> science is under stress as fiscal austerity forces governments to make tough decisions. last week we heard from n.i.h. director francis collins who oversees the world's largest medical research budget. > i've been been involved in this enterprise now for 30 years, and the pace of discovery is accelerating at really remarkable pace. it allows us to make things possible that we wouldn't have dreamed up a decade ago. at the same time, neither i nor anybody else who's been aen for a long time in biomedical research can remember a time where the enterprise felt under such stress in terms of whether the resources will be there to allow these discoveries to continue to happen. >> colin said there ant any easy answers. n.i.h. is a critical part of the ecosystem but its work it only be furktly translated into medical progress if other part
against women in science. behind the headlines: bpa, a chemical used in plastic that's everywhere and raising health concerns. wa >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, tweeting firestorm. gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan generated controversy this week when he stopped off from his campaign to buy hunting gear for his 10-year-old daughter. the avid hunter said his daughter is ready to go hunting for the first time. he bought her a rifle for christmas last year. ryan fans banded together on twitter to show their second amendment support by posting pictures of their daughters shooting all types of guns, ranging from pistols to semi-automatic weapons. the informal girls with guns campaign had hundreds of fans posting stories and pictures to twitter and other social networking sites. but not everyone is all smiles. some parents voiced concern about putting guns in the hands of children. >> so congresswoman, norton, will this help lower the coveted women wrote to the romney/ryan ticket.
for 2012. 14 commissions. thank you very much. >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in t
in the company's greatest history of leadership and development and our partnering of life science firms. today we'll start the clock on what we'll hope will be a longlar of collaboration between bay area and the most innovative companies in the area. before we introduce the first companies to occupy the area -- -- >> thank you, terry. i guess as everybody knows here, bayer has next year a history of 150 years' of successful r&d. i can assure everybody things have changed how we do r&d over the past 150 years, some things remain the same, which is you need great people talking to each other, networking and when we took a little while ago the decision to move here, it was for very simple reason. we understood that director kelly was not willing to move the whole qb3 do richmond. [ laughter ] as a consequence we wanted to have our scientists in the midst of wonderful, very inspiring campus. however, we never really gave up on the idea of getting creative young people, young start-ups to us. and this is now happening today. establishing the collaborator will mean that we'll attract young comp
nyguen is one of those students he has a bachelors in computer science and you would think in silicon valley that would all but guarantee you a job. minh nyguen sjsu graduate:"so now i'm back at it looking for a job again looking for anything web related. web testing or anything." despite nyguen's difficulty finding a job ... the unemployment rate is dropping. according to the california employment development department the jobless rate went down from 8.8 percent in july to 8.5 percent in august in the south bay. last year the average was 9.7 percent. susan rockwell is assistant director for employment services at the san jose state career center. susan rockwell assistant director for employment services at the career center "i think it is easier than it was a year ago because the job market has improved then what it was a year ago. i also think that it depends on how much time a student invests in it. so if you're really invested and you're putting your full time efforts into finding a position you're probably gonna find one faster than someone who is spending a little bit of time."
campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sor
see more young men and majoring in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than
% registered democrats. but only 14% are republican. social science is only 6%. >> 70 2% self identify as liberal. which is a big disparity between them and the general public. john: you were a junior when obama was elected? >> it was light a little of the colt it happened across the nation. john: not just the attitude but there are actual space -- speech restriction red light, yellow light and this university was demoted? >> to policies unc maintains which is sexual-harassment if you attended college and other than unc it bans all sexually explicit jokes. john: david, you have a copy what did you find? >> sexually explicit jokes jokes, books, it is different -- difficult to control how you look at someone. policy in the residence halls to avoid using the returners spoken word in the way that offends. that is a rage asleep fraud. a picture of mitt romney would offend 70%. [laughter] john: you may not explicitly or implicitly asked for sex. john: then how do you get there? [laughter] is it automatically rate? >> these policies are not well thought out. this is what you get to with burea
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
all the furniture from the science wing. that'd show 'em. anna belle laughed her head-back laugh. learning happens in many different ways, i'm just saying. but even something this silly could get out of hand, and she knew it. the science teachers, especially, that was where scores most needed to come up. anna belle looked to the ceiling. after 15 years as an administrator, she knew ms. kaiser's kind. ms. kaiser was young, ms. kaiser had time and energy to spare and apparently tables too. [laughter] anna belle had been like ms. kaiser once, in another life, it seemed. can you tell carmen to lasso those teachers up? i told them, do not move furniture. then she hurried the talk along. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction, and after that there was still the matter of the squirrel eating through i.t. cables to address. after the meeting anna belle made her rounds. she came across a teacher agonizing over whether to shut down his fish tank. no be, anna belle told him, there's a living thing in there -- [laughter] so this next passage involves something that shouldn't ever hav
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
that that dollar is wisely spent. i think they stand for civil rights. i know they're all for education in science and training, which i strongly support. they want these young people to have a chance to get jobs and the rest. i think the business community wants to get involved. i think they're asking for new and creative ways to try to reach it with everyone involved. i think that's part of it. i think also that the american people want a balanced program that gives us long-term growth so that they're not having to take money that's desperate to themselves and their families and give it to someone else. i'm opposed to that, too. >> and now it is time for our rebuttal for this period. mr. president? >> yes. the connection that's been made again between the deficit and the interest rates -- there is no connection between them. there is a connection between interest rates and inflation, but i would call to your attention that in 1981 while we were operating still on the carter-mondale budget that we inherited -- that the interest rates came down from 211/2, down toward the 12 or 13 figure. and whil
in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tenn
>>> today on mosaic we're going to talk about science. and i guess the canon lawyer with the archdiocese of san francisco will have to speak for himself. are you insane? >>> i'm working on its. >>> that is kind of the hope of the charge that will all work towards holiness. >>> the church has seats in which you think would be an opening good dialogue about sainthood canonization and what people it chosen to be saints what would be a good place to start? a >>> since i've been around long before there were canonized an officially recognized by the church we are are called to holiness that's the fundamental part of the christian life and the church missing a value in making these people recognized and bring them to the christian faith as models and place before recess people commit called upon for intercession. the zero aspects of sainthood that we will get into. >>> when we talk about canonization it is to be inscribed in the canons of the church. to be in the church for ever. >>> there's a book called the roman martyrology the official book that has all of the le
best educated and best trained workers in the world. that is why we trained 1000 more mass and science teachers. -- that is why we insisted on 100,000 more math and science teachers. we need that. we want to recruit these folks fifth as community colleges, we know we can create 2 million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing jobs of the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. in the next four years. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. ladies and gentlemen,there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask fifth very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million fifth we are going to c
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
to believe that science reduces humanity, that science gives you a bleak, cold, empty, barren view of the universe and of life. quite the contrary. science is enriching and fulfilling. what's going to happen when i die? if i met god, the unlikely event after i died, i think the first thing i would say is which one are you? are you zeuss, are you thor? which god are you? why did you take such great pains to conceal yourself and hide away from us. >> and you can see more fascinating interviews like this one online at our website, go to cnn.com/video and search red chair. up next, a story involving yard sales, a space launch and bobble head of president obama. can you figure it out? now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of american
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid all tourist cars an
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
involved? >>> i was really interested in science and math as a student myself a long time ago my guidance counselors pushed me and soy started engineering and majored in that the spent my career in the engineering field. >>> but you have friends concept should engineering >>> i went to vanderbilt university as where i got my degree. the move up to a bay area to work for a biotechnology company. i spent over 20 years >>> vanderbilt is a great school. i was thinking about my high-school counselor who said i should be a secretary and so things have changed a little bit i'm glad to hear that. had to get the idea for black girls code. >>> my moment was when two different motivators when one was personal and one was professional had been in corporate america for a long time, do something different and being in the bay area of course i want to jump into this blossoming technology community. a certain network in go to events. and i did not releasing it too well with me of why that was the case. and on the personal side i have a daughter and is 13 now to 12 the time which is always on the computer
the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need at our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask e wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> we have several big stories tonight, including a deadly crash in spotsylvania county. what investigators have learned so far. plus we're learning about the strange man -- the estrang
question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, you know, you could ar
search spending, perhaps new colors and computer science graduates the press people coming in from out a state of getting the shop's wares people and laid off from manufacturing plant or call center do not have the skills the required to fill the shops. the will be left out. >>> another thing with the job statistics is when the call center is closing are shifting its call centers of state. and campbell soup and the governor and the politicians create all these other jobs. my question is are the jobs your greeting now to the how to pay and benefits that the old jobs have? or the new jobs different? >>> there's a fundamental shift in the skills that required for these new jobs. it used to be the case that could high-school graduate work at high school education and concurrent yourself a middle-class income and and and nothing gets no longer the case. >>> college crash which now are being hired full-time but they're piling on part-time. index difficult to bridge over into full time because the market to benefit cost them. is not the same job as it was before. >>> some the jobs are not ava
, integrated science or integrated math which could get you to graduation, but could never get you to college. that a through g graduation requirement gave them access, so, that's one fabulous thing about this graduation requirement. the other thing is it gives them opportunity. quite frankly, d or better gives them no opportunity. a d or better says will not get them into college. a d or better. and quite frankly it's even cs and d at some colleges. so, d or better is actually not an adequate, i think, level to say that we have graduated with all fairness, have graduated our students prepared to college or a job because d or better is not prepared for college or a job. so, as a board i think if we're going to be looking at this graduation requirement should it be c or better or d or better. we're giving the numbers for both to see how much work we have to do. i think you can see on the chart even with the d or better we have much, much more work to do. this talks with black migration, african-american migration, outmigration. this is a huge factor. you are absolutely right about education, a
about literacy development, curriculum development, and also science and technology, engineering and math. some examples in the out of school time activities are kindergarten through 8 students. you see tutoring and mentoring is a key highlight. san francisco students back on track. across the cities we also have beacon centers. so, again, they have on-site services. for example, visitacion valley school and [speaker not understood]. one is more complicated. it includes teens programming. the first line is specialized out of school teen programming. what students [speaker not understood] project based learning and they get to showcase their work at the end of the curriculum. summer transition program is something that we will be funding in the upcoming funding cycle. we currently have summer programming which i'll explain a little more later. work force is a very key component to ensure us -- students succeeding in school. we have relevant learning. we have work services in the school site and also after school. [speaker not understood]. we fund 15 centers, 15 different high scho
not understood]. i'm a san francisco college student majoring in political science. i am the youth commissioner for district 10 appointed by supervisor malea cohen. i spent time in group homes and two consecutive years in juvenile hall. since then i've come a long way and thankful for being part of the youth commission in addition to working with the juvenile department. we heard from the youth and what they expect from the m-o-u. we share similar concerns to how you'ring out feel. we believe that including youth in the selection and valuation of the sro [speaker not understood] between our youth and officers. we, too, believe that adequate training for our police on how to deal with the city's young people will ensure safety between the police and our youth. in our historical joint hearing between the police and the youth commission on march 7th of this year we had three simple recommendations that were agreed to by the chief. one of which included an updated m-o-u and i have three here for you so you guys can see. one of which included an updated m-o-u in addition to a widespread pamphlet and
, too. as it is, we're falling behind in math and science throughout the world. the states are broke. i get them. i'm not sure we shoulder our kids with the burden. >> jim, last word before we go to break. >> these are not mutually exclusive. it will save monies that can be saved. it will push kids through the system that should be pushed through the system. even if you aren't going to divert that money elsewhere, it will leave more money to give those kids that need the attention more help. >> all right, guys. great discussion. very interesting discussion. thank you very much. well, coming up, everybody, get out your checkbook and maybe life preserver. a new report showing a titanic size bail-out may be sink taxpayers. taxpayers. talk about a food fight. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios hey, bro. or engaging. conversations help us learn and grow. at wells fargo, we believe you can never underestimate the power of a conversation. it's this exchange
want their children educated. they want to get our edge back in science, and they want a policy headed by the president that helps close this gap that's widening between the united states and europe and japan. the american people want to keep opening doors. they want those civil rights laws enforced. they want the equal rights amendment ratified. they want equal pay for comparable effort for women. and they want it because they've understood from the beginning that when we open doors, we're all stronger, just as we were at the olympics. i think as you make the case, the american people will increasingly come to our cause. >> mr. mondale, isn't it possible that the american people have heard your message -- and they are listening -- but they are rejecting it? >> well, tonight we had the first debate over the deficit. the president says it'll disappear automatically. i've said it's going to take some work. i think the american people will draw their own conclusions. secondly, i've said that i will not support the cuts in social security and medicare and the rest that the president has pr
of the human mind would shock you. >> host: thank you so much. the secret science of winning campaigns is provocative and playing the groundwork for things to come. thank you for doing this. are you doing this going forward? >> i am reporting for slate. especially right teeing about the nuts and bolts. it is a fun time i will be out on election day. >> we will hear about it when the election is over. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> let me start tonight to ask you come at you focus on nine women per know-how do so let them? >> -- how did you select them? we could have done more but with the confine of the book you could only do so much. democrats, republicans, diff erent ages. we knew on the basis of nine you could not make generalizations that were 100% certain. conclusions were hypotheses that other people run with. in order to make that hypothesis we needed a diverse group. >> we also included women that was the white house project so several with men that the white house project identified olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius sebelius, they want to consider the notion with her
and making fun of each other while we are in the science fair together. >> together they applied their skills to find ways to save their school districts tens of thousands of colors in energy costs. something the las of 1936 never had to worry about. >> it's baby steps you have to take to lead to a big difference. it's what you have to do. every light switch counts. >> for example, this lamp is an older system. it's about one and a half inches in diameter and uses more energy than newer models. >> their cool, they know it best, and they can help us out with specific counts and specific information. the project was made 'baseball pg&e innovator pilot program wherein saytors like duane are brought on board to do an energy audit. in this case he was teamed with those who know the campus best, the members of the green engineering academy. >> that measure we identified was about 100,000kwh of annual savings which i think is $14,000 for the school each year that they would save. >> the students were able to identify more than 45 quad lamps, multiple thermostats and old computers that were outdated
, weekend, home, science which were controversial but magnets for advertising. he created a national edition, bought up other newspapers and magazines and television stations. by the time he stepped down in 1997, the company was bringing in more than $2.5 billion in revenue. he was tough when he needed to be, facing down the nixon administration by publishing the secret penalty gone papers on the vietnam war and faced criticism from his own profession after giving an op-ed to welcome sapphire who went onto win a pulitzer. his son now runs the paper and company. he was 86. media monitor is next. >>> time for the media monitor. a look at the hits and errors in the news business. >>> roger simon got attention for his political column this week because he had paul ryan reportedly using a toxic nickname for his running mate, let ryan be ryan and let the stench be the stench. suddenly you could smell that story in lots of places. >> yes. the stench. that is what paul ryan is actually calling mitt romney according to politico. >> "the new york times" columnist blogged this is bad behavior, you're s
are failing us. a bill to expand the green cards allotted to foreign students in stem field, science, technology, engineering, mathematics, was voted down in congress. on a recent prime time special on cnn, "fixing immigration," i pointed out that canada and australia now have larger foreign-born populations than the united states. both of those countries revamped their immigration systems to attract and keep the best and brightest foreigners, but we're closing the door to many of the smartest potential entrepreneurs in the world. if we want job creators, let's stop kicking them out of the country. >>> when we come back, mahmoud ahmadinejad apologizes to new yorkers. more of my interview with the president of iran. ♪ so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. >>> president
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> i've been warning you for months, there is an economic storm coming our way from europe and you need to take cover. i've given you reasons why. i pointed my finger at politicians who aren't doing enough to shelter you. i argued with economists, i even blamed you for your part in this. after all that, i got to give you some props. all you see is sunshine and blue skies ahead. despite those threatening thunder clou thunderclouds out of europe, the inconsistent monthly jobs report and the ongoing scorched earth politics in washington, apparently you are feeling pretty good. consumer confidence jumped in september. take a look at that, by nine points. optimism about the jobs market drove that increase despite the fact we only added 96,000 jobs last month. let's see what we do when we get the jobs numbers on friday. not so bad, 96,000 jobs. never mind this week's forecast for higher inflation. that's not bothering you. or the puny increase that
-intellectualism and hostility science, politicized religion is the sheet anchor of the tree or a 40-year-old culture wars and that's the end of that passage. i hope the listener does not construe this as a condemnation of religion. it is rather a condemnation of the merger of politics and religion that we've been seeing occurring over the last 30 years, a phenomenon that debases both politics and religion. as i conclude the tab turner, the united states has been fortunate to have a weighted sum of the worst aspect of europe's history. it had something to do with it, but so did the system of governments that permitted and encouraged religious pluralism, what america did not tubeless mandate a religious test for the office or basis for our domestic detentions as freedom of the bible. the party is attempting to do michelle long recredit. not so much for the republican party. what about the democrats? as i described them in the introduction, the democratic party hosted far too long on franklin d. roosevelt's legacy became complacent and began to feel entitled to its near hegemonic position in culture and the
the political campaign. his book is the victory lap. the secret science of winning campaigns. .. but, maybe i should start by orienting people to what the school book is. it's part of a series that oxford publishes called a very short introduction and they are short, they have about 300 titles, and they asked me to do a supreme court title. i guess about three years ago and the book cannot this spring. it came out on the eve of the health care decision. so, who knew three years ago that we would be faced with a supreme court dealing with the most closely watched and maybe one of the most contentious case in many many years, and i would be happy -- the book doesn't say anything about the health care case, so in the q&a, i would be happy to share some conversations about that with you. but i thought i would step back and give a little bit of my take on how the court has gotten to where it is, not so much current events, but really looking back to read the book starts with a little history. it's not a book of history. i may court watcher is what i think of myself as a core group be. what is inte
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